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Abercrombie abandons well-known brand logo

Brenda Reyn, Graphics Editor

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Abercrombie and Fitch, a young adult clothing company famous for its moose logo, has decided to change their apparel to match with more recent trends. On Aug. 29, the company announced they will be dropping the logo from their apparel in the spring 2015 clothing line.

Abercrombie has been in retail since the company’s founding in 1892. However, according to “The New York Times,” the company has recently experienced a decline in revenue. In a three month period between May 2014 and September 2014, the retailer company had lost $23.7 million. The company currently holds 832 stores across the nation compared to the 1,014 stores they had in 2012 and plans to close 180 more stores by 2015.

In a recent press release, Abercrombie reported that it is going through its 10th straight decline in same-store sales, or revenue of stores that have been open for at least one year. Net sales, or the company’s revenue after a deduction of returns, has also decreased by six percent.

“[Abercrombie dropping their logo] is a smart move,” business teacher Jacqueline King said. “Now, people are creating their own sense of style, and they often buy clothing from brands where logos are not the focal point. What you used to be paying for was the expensive logo, but now Abercrombie must rethink.”

Abercrombie’s targeted group is young adults, yet fewer are shopping at Abercrombie according to King. Comparable store sales, which is the amount of revenue generated in the most recent accounting period, have dropped by eight percent. Christina Erickson, Fashion Merchandising & Design teacher, attributes this to the new trend of individuality among the younger generation. She notes that companies such as H&M and Zara, which have no logos on their clothes, are doing well since they give a much larger range for shoppers to mix and match their styles.

“Abercrombie wanted everyone to look the same,” Erickson said. “Ten years ago preppy conformity was cool, but people aren’t buying those things any more. The styles have changed. People now want to be more individualistic.”

In addition to dropping and removing the focus off the logo, Abercrombie will also be creating bigger sizes. King believes that in doing so, they are currently trying to appeal to expand their target market. Abercrombie is smart for trying to follow current trends, and people should keep an eye on the future of it, King said.

“I think that it is important to express your individual style,” Erickson said. “And if your style is what Abercrombie is expressing, then continue shopping. But you should always try to go outside of your comfort zone and try something new—that’s what fashion is all about.”

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Abercrombie abandons well-known brand logo