Statesman

Untold Stories: Rudolfo Gonzalez

Bella Schneider, Staff Reporter

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Q&A: Rudolfo Gonzalez

Stevenson’s security guards do so much for us. They help keep us safe and secure, yet their hard work often goes unnoticed. A large part of their job deals with building connections with the students. One well known security guard is Rodolfo Gonzalez. As I walked up to Rodolfo to talk to him, he immediately greeted me with a fist bump and had a genuine smile across his face. Throughout our interview, he stopped numerous times to greet students who were walking by. Here is a look into more about the life of the friendly, happy, chill, mustache-man Rodolfo.

Yo trabajo desde el once a las siete y media. Tengo diecisiete años aquí; empiezo a trabajar en el año 2002.”
I work from 11 until 7:30. I’ve been here for seventeen years; I began to work here in the year 2002.

“Me encanta conversar con los niños. Me gusta saludar a ellos y preguntar cómo están.”
I love to converse with the students. I like to greet them and ask them how they’re doing.

“Tengo muchas memorias. Las memorias buenas que tengo es cuando hablo con los niños y me saludan y todo. Eso hace un día bonita para mi.”
I have a lot of memories. The best ones are from when I speak with the students and they greet me. That makes a beautiful day for me.

“He vivido en los estados unidos para treinta años. Estaba buscando una vida mejor. He vivido en Jalisco México. Me gustaba vivir allí, estaba bien pero quería buscar algo mejor y viene por acá. ”
I’ve lived in the United States for thirty years. I was searching for a better life. I used to live in Jalisco Mexico. I liked to live there, it was a good life but I was looking for something better so I came to the United States.

“Es cuando tengo que corregir a los niños. A veces no les gustan pero todo el resto esta bien.”
It’s when I have to correct the kids. Sometimes they don’t like it but the rest of my job is good.

“Tengo dos hijos, tengo un niño que va a cumplir veintitrés años y una niña que tiene diecisiete”
I have two children, I have a son who is going to turn twenty three years old and a daughter who is seventeen.

“Esta checando los pasillos y los baños y los commons y hacer los busses. Tengo que checar afuera también.”
It’s to check the halls, bathrooms, commons, and control the buses. I also have to check outside.

“Trabajé en una fábrica para una máquina grande. Hacía partes para carros. La fábrica cerró y aplica aquí y empieza a trabajar aquí.”
I worked using large machines for a factory making parts for cars. The factory closed so I applied here and began to work here.

“Una lección es respetar a la gente para que ellos se respetan también”
A lesson is to respect others so that they respect you as well.

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About the Contributor
Bella Schneider, Staff Reporter

Hi my name is Bella Schneider and I'm a senior. Outside of Statesman you can find me doing Zumba or yoga. I also participate in Rotary Youth Club and my...

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Untold Stories: Rudolfo Gonzalez